Opiate Addiction and Types of Treatment Provided

Suboxone has produced the least amount of acclaim for drug addiction treatment, yet it is the one drug that is widely dispensed by physicians.

If you are taking a prescription drug right now, chances are you are taking it incorrectly. Misuse is a major health problem in the United States. The U.S. Government estimates approximately 11 Million Americans are dependent on drugs, but there are more addicts than drug centers. A large percentage of addicts seeking help face long waiting lists and thus become hesitant to start a program once their name surfaces to the top of the list. Almost 70 percent of people face a waiting list for longer than thirty days.

Those dependent on prescription drugs have a mind-set that is different from what addiction-free individuals believe. Addicts are resistant to letting go of their drugs. They typically justify their drug use because for many, they have gotten the drugs legitimately, from their doctor. Some addicts do not realize they are prone to addiction, and they can become hooked on a legal drug. Equally unfortunate is the addict who finally realizes they require help, and then seek help only to be placed on a waiting list. In the end, far too many addicts go untreated. It would seem the odds are against addiction treatment, but Suboxone relieves this problem since the guidelines to prescribe the drug is more relaxed and offer greater flexibility.

What is Suboxone?

Suboxone contains two active substances, buprenorphine and naloxone, both used to treat dependence on opioid drugs. The cost of treatment depends on the dose used and the frequency of services. This cost is higher than that of methadone treatment when the two drugs are served daily; however, there is greater flexibility in prescribing Suboxone.

How Does Suboxone Work?

Suboxone binds to opioid receptors, and thus produces welcoming effects of euphoria, and a secure comforting feeling, although at much lower levels than those addicts would of total opioid agonists such as methadone. The effects of these agonists are sufficient to allow addicts to stop the misuse of opiates, without encountering withdrawal symptoms.

The Benefits of Suboxone

· Less risk of respiratory problems
· Lower risk of overdose
· The withdrawal symptoms are less profound than when using methadone to combat addiction
· Euphoric symptoms occur less

Adverse Effects of Suboxone

The side effects of Suboxone mainly occur when too much of the drug is taken. The symptoms are similar to the side effects of opiates:

· Headache
· Sick
· Constipation (delayed bowel function)
· Poor sleep
· Sleepy
· Drowsiness
· Dizzy
· Sweaty
· Breathing difficulties (always contact a doctor)
· Dry mouth (brushing your teeth regularly and extra good care of your teeth)
· Slight pain is felt with less risk of causing more inflammation or untreated injuries
· Psychological problems (hallucinations, nightmares, depression) treatment should be coordinated with psychologist
· Itchy rash (contact your physician in connection with possible allergic reaction)
· Sleep apnea (consult a physician)
· Difficult to urinate (call a physician)

Every drug has an adverse effect, yet the result of using Suboxone is positive.